To Be a Better Man - Netflix

Wed 19 June 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Scripted Chinese

Lu Yuan worked hard in America to become a Michelin 3-starred chef. To many, he is the Devil incarnate, reckless and wanton. But when it comes to the person he loves, he is an entirely different "good man," loyal, kind, and honest. After a nightmarish car accident takes away his friend Da Peng, Lu Yuan planned to return home with Da Peng's ashes, return his daughter to her mother and then die quietly. However, he runs into the person he doesn't want to see and becomes entangled with his ex, Gan Jing, their old classmate, Jiang Hao Kun, and Hao Kun's younger sister, Jiang Lai.

To Be a Better Man - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Chinese

Status: Ended

Runtime: 55 minutes

Premier: 2016-05-31

To Be a Better Man - Be Here Now (album) - Netflix

Be Here Now is the third studio album by English rock band Oasis, released on 21 August 1997 by Creation Records. Oasis had achieved worldwide success with their 1994 debut album Definitely Maybe and 1995 follow up (What's the Story) Morning Glory? The third album was highly anticipated by both fans and music critics. Oasis' management company, Ignition, were aware of the dangers of overexposure, and before release sought to control the media's access to the album. The campaign included limiting pre-release radio airplay and forcing journalists to sign gag orders. The tactics resulted in the alienation of both the press and many industry personnel connected with the band, and fueled large-scale speculation and wide publicity within the British music scene. On the first day of release, Be Here Now sold over 424,000 copies, becoming the fastest-selling album in British chart history, while initial reviews were overwhelmingly positive. The album's producer Owen Morris said the recording sessions were marred by arguments and drug abuse, and that the band's only motivations were commercial. As of 2008, the album had sold eight million copies worldwide. It was the biggest selling album of 1997 in the UK with 1.47 million units sold that year.

To Be a Better Man - Promotion - Netflix

When Alan McGee, Creation's publicist Johnny Hopkins, and marketing executive Emma Greengrass first heard Be Here Now at Noel Gallagher's house, each had their doubts about its artistic value, but kept their doubts to themselves. One Creation employee recalled “a lot of nodding of heads, a lot of slapping of backs.” McGee later admitted to having strong misgivings at first: “I heard it in the studio and I remember saying 'We'll only sell seven million copies' ... I thought it was too confrontational.” However, in an interview with the music press a few days later he predicted the album would sell twenty million copies. McGee's hyperbole alarmed both Oasis and their management company Ignition, and both immediately excluded him from involvement in the release campaign. Ignition's strategy from that point on centred on an effort to suppress all publicity, and withheld access to both music and information from anybody not directly involved with the album's release. Fearful of the dangers of over-hype and bootlegging, their aim was to present the record as a “regular, everyday collection of tunes.” To this end they planned a modest marketing budget, to be spent on subdued promotional activities such as street posters and music press adverts, while avoiding mainstream instruments such as billboard and TV advertising. According to Greengrass “We want to keep it low key. We want to keep control of the whole mad thing.” However, the extent that Ignition were willing to go to control access to the album generated more hype than could normally have been expected, and served to alienate members of both the print and broadcast media, as well as most Creation staff members. When “D'You Know What I Mean?” was planned as the first single, Ignition decided on a late release to radio so as to avoid too much advance exposure. However, three stations broke the embargo, and Ignition panicked. According to Greengrass: “we'd been in these bloody bunker meetings for six months or something, and our plot was blown. 'Shit, it's a nightmare'.” BBC Radio 1 received a CD containing three songs ten days before the album's release, on condition that disc jockey Steve Lamacq talked over the tracks to prevent illegal copies being made by listeners. The day after Lamacq previewed the album on his show, he received a phone call from Ignition informing him that he would not be able to preview further tracks because he didn't speak enough over the songs. Lamacq said, “I had to go on the air the next night and say, 'Sorry, but we're not getting any more tracks.' It was just absurd.” According to Creation's head of marketing John Andrews, “[The campaign] made people despise Oasis within Creation. You had this Oasis camp that was like 'I'm sorry, you're not allowed come into the office between the following hours. You're not allowed mention the word Oasis.' It was like a fascist state.” One employee recalled an incident “when somebody came round to check our phones because they thought The Sun had tapped them.” When Hopkins began to circulate cassette copies of the album to the music press a few weeks later, he required that each journalist sign a contract containing a clause requiring that the cassette recipient, according to Select journalist Mark Perry, “not discuss the album with anyone—including your partner at home. It basically said don't talk to your girlfriend about it when you're at home in bed.” The Mail on Sunday wrote of Russell “[He] has a mind like a steel trap and the organisational skills of Winston Churchill.” Reflecting in 1999, Greengrass admitted: “In retrospect a lot of the things we did were ridiculous. We sit in [Oasis] meetings today and we're like 'It's on the Internet. It's in Camden Market. Whatever'. I think we've learned our lesson.” According to Perry: "It seemed, particularly once you heard the album, that this was cocaine grandeur of just the most ludicrous degree. I remember listening to “All Around the World” and laughing—actually quite pleasurably—because it seemed so ridiculous. You just thought: Christ, there is so much coke being done here."

To Be a Better Man - References - Netflix


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