A Life Time Love - Netflix

Mon 17 June 2019

Filed under netflix

Tags netflix Scripted Chinese

The story takes place in a mythological world with demons, gods, and humans cohabiting, set during the Three Sovereigns and Five Emperors period. The world is split into three kingdoms - Xuan Yang, Ling Yun and Xuan Mu.

Chi Yun is a war god from Ruo Jiang Tribe, a wild beast-turned-man driven by revenge, who wants to dominate and unite all living things under one ruler. His resolve is immovable until he meets Mu Qingmo, a princess from the Xuan Yang Kingdom. However, Qingmo is betrothed by her family to Prince Sheng Lun from the Ling Yun Kingdom. Nonetheless, her heart belongs to Chi Yun. The two made a promise to meet annually under the peach blossoms of No Return Valley, where Chi Yun made Qingmo a promise of love, that he will give up everything, and stay by her side for the rest of their lives.

Complications arise when Qingmo's father invades Ruo Jiang in order to attain world domination. Torn between family and love, Qingmo is forced to make some difficult choices when her kingdom clashes with Ruo Jiang numerous times, resulting in world chaos.

A Life Time Love - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: Chinese

Status: Running

Runtime: 35 minutes

Premier: 2017-06-12

A Life Time Love - Time Life - Netflix

Direct Holdings Global LLC, through its subsidiaries StarVista Live, Lifestyle Products Group and Time Life, is a creator and direct marketer that is known for selling books, music, video/DVD, and multimedia products. The current focus of the company is music, video and entertainment experiences (such as cruises) as the book division closed in 2003. Its products have been sold throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia through television, print, retail, the Internet, telemarketing, and direct sales. Current operations are focused in the US and Canada with limited retail distribution overseas. Time Life was founded in 1961 as the book division of Time Inc. It took its name from Time Inc.'s cornerstone magazines, Time and Life, but remained independent of both. Starting in 1967, Time Life combined its book offerings with music collections (two to five records) and packaged them as a sturdy box set. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, the selection of books, music and videos grew and was diversified into more genres. When record labels stopped producing vinyl albums in 1990, Time Life switched to CD only. In the mid-1990s, Time Life acquired Heartland Music, with the Heartland Music label now appearing as a brand. This company was subsequently sold off and is no longer attached to Time Life. At the end of 2003 Time Life was acquired by Ripplewood Holdings L.L.C. and ZelnickMedia Corporation to become part of Direct Holdings Worldwide L.L.C. Direct Holdings Americas Inc. operates as a leader in the sale of music and video products under the Time Life brand. Since 2003, Direct Holdings US Corp is the legal name of Time Life, and is no longer owned by its former parent Time Warner, later Time Inc. in June 9, 2014. In March 2007, Ripplewood led a group that took The Reader's Digest Association private and treated Time Life as a division of RDA. By 2003 onward, a disclaimer on the copyright stated that it is “not affiliated with Time Warner Inc. or Time Inc.”, who owns the Time and Life magazines which this company name came from. In 2013, Reader's Digest Association sold Time Life to Mosaic Media Investment Partners.

A Life Time Love - Pop music enters the picture - Netflix

Time Life's first successful foray into rock music came in 1986, with a series called “The Rock 'n' Roll Era.” Each volume in that series—like similar series that followed—focused on a particular year (in this case, 1955 through 1964—the early, pre-Beatles years of rock music), a stylistic trend or particular artist influential in rock music. Each volume had 22 tracks, and was said to contain the original hit recording by the original artist (although this wasn't always true on early pressings of the early albums in the series). The songs themselves represented the most important and popular songs from the period or subject featured. An essay published by Both Sides Now Publications noted that Time-Life's move into rock music came at a time when much of the adult audience Time-Life catered to grew up during the rock-and-roll era and, as such, the new series was consistent with its goal of catering to an adult audience. “The Rock 'n' Roll Era” series was a big success, and by the time the final volume was issued in the early 1990s, more than 50 different volumes (including two Christmas albums) had been released. This paved the way for more country and pop music-intensive series, including “Country USA,” “Classic Rock,” “Sounds of the Seventies,” “Sounds of the Eighties,” “Your Hit Parade” (a series featuring popular music of the 1940s through early 1960s) and “Super Hits.” Like the earlier series, each volume issued had its own paperback booklet containing liner notes and information about the songs, with the addition of placement on various Billboard magazine charts. Like the earlier box sets featuring other musical styles and genres, the country and pop music series were advertised in magazines, catalogs and direct mail. By this time, some of these collections were advertised on television: either commercials or 30-minute infomercials. The television advertisements used slogans (e.g., “Relive your high school days ...”), clips of songs included in each volume (along with a scrolling list of other titles), a commercial spokesman (usually a performer or legendary disc jockey relevant to a given series, such as Rick Dees for a 1970s-intensive collection and Ralph Emery for a country music series) and testimonials from customers attesting to the quality and value of the albums, to pitch a given series. Key selling points of these collections are that each track was digitally transferred to the desired format using the original master recordings, as opposed to being “re-records”; and that the most popular and requested songs by customers could be found in a single collection (as opposed to a customer having to purchase many albums to obtain just a few desired tracks). Customers were given a choice of which format they wanted their box set: either vinyl albums (through 1990), 8-track or cassette tape, or compact disc; today's box sets are offered only as compact discs. While most of Time Life's box sets and releases were critically hailed, there were also some minor faults pointed out by critics. For instance, several early pressings of the early volumes in “The Rock'n'Roll Era” series contained stereo re-recordings of the original hits (something that would be corrected on later pressings, either with the correct original recording or a replacement track). Sometimes, the most popular songs of a given time period were omitted, frequently due to licensing issues. Examples included The Beatles and The Rolling Stones for the Classic Rock and “Super Hits”/“AM Gold” series; and Prince, Madonna, Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson on the main Sounds of the Eighties series. Through 2010, several different series Time Life had offered were available on a subscription basis, either by calling a 1-800 number or sending a completed postcard-sized card and payment to Time–Life. Purportedly, the customer would get a specific volume (as advertised on TV or in a magazine) first, before receiving a new volume roughly every other month (on the format of their choice); customers and had the option of keeping just the volumes they wanted. In time, each volume was also offered for individual sale. Several of the series – especially the pop, rock, country and rhythm and blues series – had retail versions for sale, released after the entire series was issued. Typically, these were sold at discount stores, often grouped in three-CD sets of 12 tracks each and having the most popular of the series' tracks, and cover artwork and naming loosely based off the subscription/catalog-exclusive titles. Additionally, the “Classic Country” series had special 15-track single-CD versions of several of its volumes issued for retail sale (in addition to budget 3-CD sets).

A Life Time Love - References - Netflix


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